AustMS2021 plenary profile – Zeev Rudnick

This is the first in a series of interviews with the plenary speakers for the upcoming 65th Annual Meeting of the AustMS.

  1. What is your earliest mathematical memory?

My family moved from Israel to Uganda when I was 8 years old, and I started school there without knowing any English. Nakasero Primary School was at the time an old fashioned colonial British school, which offered very little help for pupils who did not know English. I was put in a class and expected to catch up on my own.
I well remember that the one subject that I was able to follow for the first few weeks was Maths: multiplication table and such matters. At that point I was grateful that math was a universal language!

  1. What made you decide to become a mathematician, and when?

In my final year at high school I was seriously thinking about taking up physics. I tried to read some of the university physics texts but decided that I needed to better understand the math, and while doing it fell in love with the subject. I participated in a couple of local math contests and received a small fellowship as a result of winning third place in one of them, and I saw that as a sign that I had a future in the subject.

  1. Name a favourite paper by a contemporary mathematician, and why (or more than one, if you can’t decide).

Some of Michael Berry’s papers and surveys are particular favourites of mine, as they have shaped my views of Quantum Chaos and its relation to Number Theory. In particular I can mention the survey:

  • Berry, M V, 1983, ‘Semiclassical Mechanics of regular and irregular motion’ in Les Houches Lecture Series Session XXXVI, eds. G Iooss, R H G Helleman and R Stora, North Holland, Amsterdam, 171-271. (author pdf)

Michael Berry is a physicist, but much of his work is mathematical and I have drawn inspiration from his way of looking at nature.

  1. What historical mathematician would you like to be able to talk maths with? What would you ask them?

I suspect that many of the great mathematicians are not great conversationalists.

  1. What result would you like to see in mathematics in the next 10 years?

I would like to see a proof of the Riemann Hypothesis. But it may well take much more than 10 years.

Credit: Copyright C.J. Mozzochi, Princeton N.J

Lecturer or Senior Lecturer in Applied and/or Computational Mathematics – Continuing, Tenure Track@ANU

Classification:       Academic Level B or C
Salary Package:    Level B  $101,805 – $115,428 pa plus 17% superannuation
                              Level C $122,240 – $135.866 pa plus 17% superannuation
Terms:                   Full-time, continuing and/or tenure track

Closing date: 21 November 2021

The Mathematical Sciences Institute (MSI) is seeking to appoint two continuing and/or tenure track mathematicians in the areas of applied and/or computational mathematics.

These positions are available at the Academic Level B and/or Level C (which equate to the positions of Assistant/Associate Professor within the United States of America).

The Mathematical Sciences Institute is seeking to offer up to two continuing and/or tenure track appointments at the Academic Level B and/or Level C (which equate to the positions of Assistant/Associate Professor within the United States of America).

These positions are established for early to mid-career academics to pursue their research career in applied and/or computational mathematics.  MSI is particularly keen to invigorate its teaching and research programs in the areas of scientific computing, high-performance computing, data science and welcomes applications from candidates in these areas. Nevertheless, applicants in all areas of applied and computational mathematics will be seriously considered.

The level of this appointment, Academic Level B or C, is to be determined by the appointee’s current research and teaching expertise.

Applicants are expected to have an outstanding record in research and teaching relative to the level of their application. The positions involve teaching both in the candidate’s area of specialisation and standard mathematics undergraduate courses.  Successful candidates will have access to a four-year start up grant to support research, visitors and conference travel.

Joint appointments with other parts of the University are a possibility, depending on their fit with other research groups at ANU.

For more information or to apply, see this page.

Associate Professor, Senior Lecturer, or Lecturer in Mathematics (Female Only) – Continuing, Tenure Track@ANU

Classification:              Academic Level D, C or B
Salary Package:           Level B $101,805 – $115,428 pa plus 17% superannuation
                                    Level C $122, 240 – $135,866 pa plus 17% superannuation
                                    Level D $146,080 – $159,582 pa plus 17% superannuation
Terms:                         Full-time, continuing and/or tenure track

Closing date: 21 November 2021

The Mathematical Sciences Institute (MSI) is strongly committed to improving the gender balance amongst staff and students.  It is taking proactive action towards this goal by advertising a full-time continuing female-only position.

The position is available at academic Level B, C or D (the latter equates to the position of Professor within the United States of America) depending on the experience of the candidate, and is open to all fields of mathematics, but preference may be given to a candidate whose research interests align with one or more of the existing research programs.

These positions are established for mid to later career academics to pursue their research-focused career in any field of mathematics, preferably in the research interests that align with one or more of the existing research programs

The level of this appointment, Academic Level D, C or B is to be determined by the appointee’s current research and teaching expertise.

Applicants are expected to have an outstanding record in research and teaching relative to the level of their application. The positions involve teaching both in the candidate’s area of specialisation and standard mathematics undergraduate courses.  Successful candidates will have access to a four-year start up grant to support research, visitors and conference travel.

Joint appointments with other parts of the University are a possibility, depending on their fit with other research groups at ANU.

More info and application process at this page.

Lecturer in secondary mathematics@USydney

Full time, continuing role, based in Camperdown Campus 

Exciting opportunity to contribute teaching and research expertise in the area of secondary mathematics education learning and curriculum

Base Salary $110,856 + 17% superannuation  

Closing date: 11.30pm, Monday 22 November 2021

The Lecturer in Secondary Mathematics will contribute to teaching and research expertise in the area of secondary mathematics education, learning and curriculum for the Sydney School of Education and Social Work. The appointee should have classroom teaching experience in secondary school settings, knowledge of current relevant school curriculum as well as research expertise in a related area of mathematics education and be prepared to contribute to secondary teacher professional learning initiatives offered by the Faculty and/or STEM Teacher Enrichment Academy.

Key responsibilities include teaching, curriculum designing, planning, evaluation and unit co-ordination of Secondary Mathematics units of study in the Master of Teaching, and Bachelor of Education (Secondary): Mathematics/Bachelor of Science programs within the Sydney School of Education and Social Work while continuing to build their research contribution, expertise and impact.

More details and apply at this page

The Logic Summer School @ ANU

An upcoming virtual event, 6-17 December 2021.

Website: http://lss.cecs.anu.edu.au

The School of Computing in the ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science will host the Logic Summer School from 6 to 17 December 2021. The Summer School will consist of short courses on aspects of pure and applied logic taught by experts from Australia and overseas, and be held virtually. 

Modern logic is the foundational discipline of the information sciences. It includes not only the science of reasoning but also computability theory, type theory and other tools for understanding processes, declarative programming, automatic proof generation, program verification and much more. It spreads into planning, into program synthesis, into circuit design and into discourse analysis. It underpins the entire science of artificial intelligence. Part mathematics, part philosophy and these days part computing science, logic remains a core intellectual study and is increasingly relevant to practical concerns.

We are excited to present a variety of courses: starting with introductory courses in the first week to advanced courses in the second, featuring topics from foundations to application, including program verification, cryptography and higher-order type theory.
The lectures are given by academics from several institutes and include Kirsten Winter (DSTG/UQ), David J. Pearce (VUW), Rob van Glabbeek (Data61/UNSW), Thomas Haines (ANU), Taichi Uemura (Stockholm U) and John Slaney (ANU).
Check our website for more details on the program and registration procedure: http://lss.cecs.anu.edu.au.

Due to ongoing travel restrictions the school will be held virtually, allowing everybody to join. 
Moreover, this year the school is 
free of charge 
for students and academics. 

* Deadline for registration: December 1, 2021

Questions? E-mail peter.hoefner@anu.edu.au

Knot Days: Virtual summer school, 15-19 November 2021

The workshop will have three mini-classes, each with lectures and problem sessions.

(1) Introduction to Legendrian Knot Theory (Joan Licata, ANU) 

This class will be broadly accessible, requiring no background in topology. We’ll introduce the basics of general knot theory (diagrams, Reidemeister moves, invariants) alongside features specific to the knot theory in contact three-manifolds.

(2) Character Varieties, A-polynomials and Knots (Stephan Tillmann, Sydney)

Many properties that allow us to distinguish and study knots are not properties of the knot, but rather of the complement of a knot. This three-dimensional space may appear less tangible than the actual knot, but allows the definition of algebraic invariants that encode information about the knot and its complement. This series of lectures focuses on invariants arising from algebraic geometry. These can be used to detect interesting surfaces spanned by knots, to recognise whether a knot is in fact knotted, and to determine whether a knot complement has a geometric structure of constant negative curvature.

These lectures will provide an overview over the main aspects of what is broadly known as Culler-Shalen theory, and describe some key applications. The techniques mix ideas from group theory, algebraic geometry and geometric topology. The level of detail given will depend on the background and interest of the audience.

(3) Jones Polynomial and Volume Conjectures (Dan Mathews, Monash)

Knots can be studied from some very different perspectives, but there are some deep conjectures that unify these perspectives. In this series of lectures we will discuss some of these different perspectives and two of the major conjectures connecting them: the volume conjecture and the AJ conjecture.

Starting from the Jones polynomial, we’ll give an overview of the broad range of ideas around these conjectures, including coloured Jones polynomials, quantum invariants, q-holonomicity, hyperbolic geometry, and skein algebras. No background will be assumed, but some knowledge of abstract algebra will be useful.

See the website for registration and more details.

2021 NSW ANZIAM branch meeting

The New South Wales branch of ANZIAM will hold a one-day mixed virtual and in person meeting (depending on circumstances, may end up purely online) on Friday the 26th of November at NUspace in Newcastle. The meeting will include our AGM.

The meeting will run from approximately 10am to 5.30pm (depending upon the number of speakers).

We are delighted to have Dr Christopher Lustri from Macquarie University, as our keynote speaker

There will be no registration fee.

If you wish to attend, please fill out the following form https://forms.gle/zSUdzaWJ4HkoimeD8 ASAP. 

If attending in person you must fill out the following form as well and present proof of double vaccination on the day.https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=nyxUhafqdE6JtaresYH-YMPY_b2B0jtCu0vbPBhEVSxUNU1VODFXRVhJRElVOVdTVlBIVkM5OTZCQS4u

Currently, the deadline for submission of abstracts is 5pm on Monday the 22nd of November.

Conference Dinner

There will be a conference dinner for those attending in person, please note whether you will be attending and any dietary requirements in the form.

Selection of Speakers

In the fortunate event that we are over-subscribed with speakers priority will first be given to students and ECR, with preference given to NSW ANZIAM members. If there are slots remaining for established researchers, preference will again be given to NSW ANZIAM members.

Student Prize

There will be a prize for the best student speaker.

Organisers

Fillipe Georgiou and Kyle Stevens,
School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle

Supported by

Research Fellow/Senior Research Fellow in Statistical Data Science@UWollongong

Faculty of Engineering & Information Sciences – School of Mathematics & Applied Statistics/ NIASRA

  • Fixed Term, full-time appointment (3 years, commencing April 2022)
  • Level B/C :  $104,870 – $127,382 + 17% superannuation

Closing date: 17 December 2021 23:59 AET

The National Institute for Applied Statistics Research Australia at the University of Wollongong, Australia, invites applications for a Research Fellow/Senior Research Fellow to join the Institute and the Data Science Team in the Research Hub for Transforming energy Infrastructure through Digital Engineering (TIDE).  The successful candidate will provide critical support through methodological development in Statistical Data Science to meet challenges faced in the energy sector. Areas of research include (and are not limited to)  

  • Statistical spatial and spatio-temporal modelling;  
  • Physical-statistical modelling; 
  • Bayesian inference and uncertainty quantification;  
  • Optimal design;  
  • Statistical machine learning;  
  • Time series modelling.  

 The appointee will collaborate closely with researchers at NIASRA, as well as other members of the Hub, which is based at the University of Western Australia. This is a vibrant and active research environment comprising inter-disciplinary expertise in oceanography, engineering, and data science. The successful candidate will have, or be close to having, a PhD in Statistics or a closely related discipline, good statistical modelling skills, good programming skills, and good communication skills. The position is for three years, with a possibility for extension.

For selection criteria, and to apply, please visit  https://ejgl.fa.ap1.oraclecloud.com/hcmUI/CandidateExperience/en/sites/CX_1/job/1871/?lastSelectedFacet=TITLES&mode=location&selectedTitlesFacet=RESEARCH_ONLY

Any queries should be directed to Andrew Zammit-Mangion

Postdoctoral Research Associate in Geometry and Topology@USydney

Full time 2 years fixed term employment, located on the Camperdown Campus at the School of Mathematics and Statistics 

Closing date: 11.59pm, Tuesday 30 November 2021

Base Salary Level A $95K – $105 p.a. + 17% superannuation.

The University of Sydney is welcoming applications for a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Geometry and Topology. The successful applicant will undertake research in the areas of low-dimensional topology and geometric structures on manifolds.

Your key responsibilities will be to:

  • undertake research in the areas of low-dimensional topology and geometric structures on manifolds.
  • write scholarly papers for publication in academic journals
  • demonstrate research excellence
  • present research results at seminars and conferences
  • support teaching activities and the supervision of undergraduate and postgraduate students.

More information and application link: https://usyd.wd3.myworkdayjobs.com/USYD_EXTERNAL_CAREER_SITE/job/Camperdown-Campus/Postdoctoral-Research-Associate-in-Geometry-and-Topology_0086333-1

PhD Top-up Scholarships: Ocean and Sea Ice Modelling

Closing date: 30 November 2021

Are you interested in understanding ocean physics, and do you have skills in computational/mathematical modelling?

The Consortium for Ocean-Sea Ice Modelling in Australia (COSIMA) is providing opportunities for PhD
students to work at the intersection of high-performance computing and ocean-climate dynamics.
Projects are available focusing on a wide range of topics, including:

  1. The role of sea ice in the climate system;
  2. Modelling biogeochemical cycles in the global ocean;
  3. Coupling between surface waves and large-scale currents;
  4. Antarctic ice shelves and their interaction with the Southern Ocean; and
  5. The sensitivity of ocean dynamics to vertical coordinate systems in ocean models.

These scholarships are valued at $7,500 per year for 3.5 years. Successful applicants will also need to be
successful in receiving a Research Training Program (RTP) scholarship, or equivalent primary scholarship,
at a COSIMA partner university (ANU, UNSW, UTas, USyd, UniMelb or U Adelaide).

To Apply, you should submit a package to Ms Alina Bryleva including:

  • A half-page statement explaining your research interests and your planned work with COSIMA.
  • Your CV and academic transcripts.
  • Provide amount and source of any existing scholarships, both top-ups and a primary stipend.

These top-up scholarships are intended primarily for new students, however existing students working on one of the COSIMA models will also be considered. Preference will be given to competitive applicants who do not already receive a top-up scholarship from another source.

Enquiries: Please contact Professor Andrew Hogg